Charles White Was a Giant, Even Among the Heroes He Painted

Charles White Was a Giant, Even Among the Heroes He Painted

“What a beautiful artist Charles White was. Hand of an angel, eye of a sage. Although White, who died in 1979, is often mentioned today as a teacher and mentor of luminaries like David Hammons and Kerry James Marshall, his is no case of reflected glory. In “Charles White: A Retrospective” at the Museum of Modern Art, from beginning to end, he shines.”

White was a recipient of a Rosenwald Grant. Read more here:https://nyti.ms/2yijHuT

Kerry James Marshall Paints for Chicago. His Mural Should Stay There.

“The painter Kerry James Marshall was born in Alabama, but he is defined by Chicago: the city he moved to in 1987, and whose private salons and public housing projects have inspired an art of rare ambition. His excellent retrospective “Mastry,” which opened at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago in 2016 and traveled to New York and Los Angeles, introduced huge new audiences to his grand tableaus of black American life, steeped in art history and defined by the coal-black paint he uses in place of African-American skin tones.”

Read More: https://nyti.ms/2EfpPcQ

Orangeburg Explores Rosenwald’s Impact

Pictured from left: With special thanks to Barbara Johnson who attended Great Branch, Gladys Moss of Bowman Rosenwald School, Joseph C. Sanders of the Berkeley Training High School, Delona J. Kindell of Great Branch, Melissa Evans Sherman of Felton Training School, Henry Summers and Elain Summers of Bowman Rosenwald School, and Ellen Zisholts co-president of the Center for Creative Partnerships- Photo by John Mack, T&D

Pictured from left: With special thanks to Barbara Johnson who attended Great Branch, Gladys Moss of Bowman Rosenwald School, Joseph C. Sanders of the Berkeley Training High School, Delona J. Kindell of Great Branch, Melissa Evans Sherman of Felton Training School, Henry Summers and Elain Summers of Bowman Rosenwald School, and Ellen Zisholts co-president of the Center for Creative Partnerships- Photo by John Mack, T&D

On March 16, 2017 Aviva Kempner’s Rosenwald was featured in the Communty Cinema social justice film series, hosted by Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College and the Center for Creative Partnerships.

Julius Rosenwald, a true pioneer in social justice, truly believed in improving the lives of African-American children through education. Rosenwald would build 5,300 schools throughout the Southern United States. From 1912 to 1932, roughly 500 “Rosenwald schools” and auxiliary buildings were built in South Carolina. Twenty-one were constructed in Orangeburg County alone, one of which was the original Felton Training School on the campus of South Carolina State College in 1925.

In 2006, a national orginazation of 10,000 African-American women known as The Links, adopted a program called “Rosenwald Schools”. This was orchestrated by the Orangeburg chapter of The Links with the goal of placing historical markers at all 21 sites in Orangeburg County. Thanks to their efforts, four schools in the county have been able to receive these historical markers.

Along with the construction of the Rosenwald schools, Julius Rosenwald also provided funds to Booker T. Washington to assist in the building of Tuskegee Institute in Alabama.

“My M.O. is to make films about under-known Jewish heroes,” Aviva Kempner, director of the film, said. “I would say Julius Rosenwald is right there on the top of being the most under-known until the film’s come out.”

Several people that attended the showing were actual students at Rosenwald schools as children and teenagers. Gladys Moss, a 1952 graduate of the Bowman Rosenwald School, attended from first through 11th grades. “I display my diploma proudly,” Moss said. “We had a wonderful school. Taught us a lot.”

Find more on the article here

On the Road to Tuskegee University

Director Aviva Kempner and poet Ethelbert Miller had a wonderful screening of Rosenwald at Tuskegee University on February 23 and 24, where Julius Rosenwald served on the board and was inspired by Booker T. Washington to build the schools. Tuskegee President Brian L. Johnson introduced Kempner and the screening was preceded by a Meet and Greet with the President’s staff. Speaking after the screening with Miller and Kempner were Dana Chandler, the archivist at Tuskegee University and Rosenwald’s great grandson Phil Rome.

Left to Right: Ethelbert Miller, Dana Chandler, Aviva Kempner and  Phil Rome

Left to Right: Ethelbert Miller, Dana Chandler, Aviva Kempner and
Phil Rome

At the Robert R. Taylor School of Architecture and Construction Science, Dr. Carla Jackson Bell, dean of the school, hosted an event for Kempner to present the Rosenwald DVD bonus feature “The Legacy of Black Architects at Tuskegee.” Kempner spoke with architecture students about the unique history of building Tuskegee.

In addition, Miller spoke to two English classes, Shakespeare and World Literature, referencing poet Langston Hughes whose own 1931 tour of colleges in the South inspired this current one. One Tuskegee graduate, Guy Trammell, wrote an enthusiastic response to the showing of the film:
“Again, thanks so much for doing this project, and for bringing the film to Tuskegee. I will be ordering a copy for the youth in our program to see this year and will be spreading the word of the DVD package you mentioned. There are many in and from Tuskegee that would be interested.
By the way, the students sitting behind me, during the film showing, were so excited to see their Tuskegee campus in the film! Those early shots had them whispering to each other, “Look that’s the band! . . . . . Look! There’s _______ Hall!” You really made their day! And mine!”

Tuskegee University is the third stop on the Rosenwald Tour, which was generously funded by the Reva and David Logan Foundation. With more support in the future from funders like the Logan Foundation, the tour can continue to more HBCU’s.

Make your tax-deductible contribution here.

Above: Statue of Booker T. Washington, founder of Tuskegee University

Above: Statue of Booker T. Washington, founder of Tuskegee University

Dillard University Hosts Rosenwald Tour

 

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Don’t miss Aviva Kempner in New Orleans this month! She will present the newly produced bonus feature on Edith Stern, the daughter of Julius Rosenwald who was so active in civil rights in New Orleans. The bonus feature will screen February 15th at the Longue Vue House and Gardens, co-sponsored by The National Council of Jewish Women.

Kempner is currently touring the film at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) with poet Ethelbert Miller. As part of the program, Miller will talk about poet Langston Hughes, a Rosenwald Fund recipient who used the funds for his own tour of schools in the South in 1931. Hughes’ tour has inspired the Rosenwald Tour. Miller will give presentations at three classes at Dillard. Stay tuned for more tour dates!

Rosenwald Film Screening at Dillard University, Georges Auditorium, 2601 Gentilly Blvd, New Orleans, LA 70122, February 15, 2017 at 6:00PM.
Q&A with Director Aviva Kempner to follow screening. Presented by Brain Food: The Dillard University President’s Lecture Series

February Tour of ROSENWALD

Audiences continue to show their love for the ideals and practices covered in ROSENWALD.
February has been a special loving month for the ROSENWALD film as director Aviva Kempner has gone from Temple Israel synagogue in Sharon, Massachusetts to Fisk University in Nashville to the San Diego Jewish Film Festival to Dilllard University in New Orleans on February 15th to screen the film.

Kempner enjoyed returning to the Fisk Library where she had researched the Rosenwald Fund archives for the film. She was so excited to meet a young scholar from the University of Chicago who is doing her PhD thesis on the Fund.

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(Left to right) Ethelbert Miller and Aviva Kempner at Fisk University in Nashville, TN.

Poet Ethelbert Miller has accompanied Kempner on the tour to these historical Black colleges under a generous grant from the Reva and David Logan Foundation. Miller is giving sparkling presentations on poet Langston Hughes, who himself had received a Rosenwald Fund grant to tour the South. Hughes’ 1931 tour inspired this modern day 2017 version.

Kempner will present the newly produced bonus feature on Edith Stern, the daughter of Rosenwald who was so active in civil rights in New Orleans. The bonus feature will screen February 15th at the Longue Vue House and Gardens, co-sponsored by The National Council of Jewish Women. As part of the event, Miller will talk about Hughes at three classes at Dillard.

Meanwhile the film is showing in many more places this month and inspiring audience members to give. One couple saw the film in Scottsdale, Arizona and wrote that the film was “FANTASTICLY INSPIRATIONAL” and they decided to re-focus their fund on scholarship.

In these times we should remember that love and support is what Julius Rosenwald was about. Audiences are reacting especially to what Rosenwald said years ago about men with wealth. His modesty lives on in the success and aspirations of those he supported.

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“Most large fortunes are made by men of mediocre ability who tumbled into a lucky opportunity, and couldn’t help but get rich.Most people are of the opinion that because a man has made a fortune, that his opinions on any subject are valuable. Don’t be fooled by believing because a man is rich, that he is necessarily smart. There is ample proof to the contrary.” –Julius Rosenwald

Besides raising funds to produce and distribute the ROSENWALD DVD with all the bonus features, the Cielsa Foundation is also fundraising to take the film on a Northern tour. The Atran Foundation just made the first contribution for this future tour.

We thank Atran, Logan Foundation and all our supporters!

Make your tax-deductible contribution here.